health

27th December – On This Day In History

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Born:

1822 Louis Pasteur (invented pasteurization) 

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Died:

2016 Carrie Fisher (actress – Star Wars)

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On This Day:

1943 The Scharnhorst (German battleship) sinks in the Barents Sea

2. Weltkrieg, Seekrieg, Marine Deutschland: Schlachtschiff 'Scharnhorst' auf See. 1943Gemaelde (Gouache) von O. Rahardt 2010

 

Have a good Thursday, 27th December

To A Gentleman On His Voyage To Great Britain For The Recovery Of His Health

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While others chant of gay Elysian scenes,
Of balmy zephyrs, and of flow’ry plains,
My song more happy speaks a greater name,
Feels higher motives and a nobler flame.
For thee, O R—–, the muse attunes her strings,
And mounts sublime above inferior things.
I sing not now of green embow’ring woods,
I sing not now the daughters of the floods,
I sing not of the storms o’er ocean driv’n,
And how they howl’d along the waste of heav’n.
But I to R—– would paint the British shore,
And vast Atlantic, not untry’d before:
Thy life impair’d commands thee to arise,
Leave these bleak regions and inclement skies,
Where chilling winds return the winter past,
And nature shudders at the furious blast.
O thou stupendous, earth-enclosing main
Exert thy wonders to the world again!
If ere thy pow’r prolong’d the fleeting breath,
Turn’d back the shafts, and mock’d the gates of death,
If ere thine air dispens’d an healing pow’r,
Or snatch’d the victim from the fatal hour,
This equal case demands thine equal care,
And equal wonders may this patient share.
But unavailing, frantic is the dream
To hope thine aid without the aid of him
Who gave thee birth and taught thee where to flow,
And in thy waves his various blessings show.
May R—– return to view his native shore
Replete with vigour not his own before,
Then shall we see with pleasure and surprise,
And own thy work, great Ruler of the skies!

 

– Phillis Wheatley

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17th May – On This Day In History

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Born:

1749 Edward Jenner (pioneer of immunology and smallpox vaccinations)

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Died:

2012 Donna Summer (singer)

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On This Day:

1949 The Republic of Ireland is recognised by Britain

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Have a good Thursday, 17th May

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27th December – On This Day In History

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Born:

1822 Louis Pasteur (inventor of pasteurization) 

lp

 

Died:

1985 Dian Fossey (zoologist – Gorillas In The Mist)

df

 

On This Day:

1943 German battleship Scharnhorst sinks 

2. Weltkrieg, Seekrieg, Marine Deutschland: Schlachtschiff 'Scharnhorst' auf See. 1943Gemaelde (Gouache) von O. Rahardt 2010

 

Have a good Wednesday, 27th December

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23rd December – On This Day In History

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Born:

1971 Corey Haim (actor – Silver Bullet) 

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Died:

1972 Charles Atlas (body builder)

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On This Day:

1912 Aswan Dam, on the Nile, begins operations

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Have a good Saturday, 23rd December

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15th September – On This Day In History

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Born:

1254 Marco Polo (explorer)

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Died:

2007 Colin McRae (rally driver)

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On This Day:

1928 Penicillin is discovered (by Alexander Fleming)

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Have a good Friday, 14th September

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8th May – On This Day In History

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Born:

1926 David Attenborough (TV presenter)

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Died:

2008 Eddy Arnold (country music singer)

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On This Day:

1980 World Health Organisation announces the eradication of smallpox

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Have a good Monday, 8th May

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Rooibos Tea

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Having grown up in South Africa, I was fortunate to have been exposed to Rooibos (Red Bush) tea from an early age. Drinking hot, cold, with milk or without has always been part of my lifestyle. And I was delighted to find it easily available here in the UK, both in shops and online.

Rooibos is grown in the Western Cape area of South Africa, in a small coastal region. It is part of a general family of plants in the region known as fynbos. People have tried to grow Rooibos elsewhere in the world, but none have been particularly successful. The unique weather conditions and soil types make reproducing the real thing in other places very difficult indeed.

It can be served in a variety of ways. Many will drink it in exactly the same way as they drink other teas – with or without milk and sugar is a personal taste. One of the most common ways to drink Rooibos is to brew it hot and strong, and then simply drop a slice of lemon into your cup. In the summer, some of us like to brew it up, let it cool and then keep a big jug of it in the fridge. Makes a very refreshing cold drink – and it’s good for you!

There are numerous benefits of Rooibos (I’ll stick to the Afrikaans name, if you don’t mind!). Obviously, for those of us who have the taste, we simply enjoy it! It’s part of our culture!

Rooibos can be enjoyed in any weather, and is delightfully refreshing. But there are also numerous, genuine benefits, some of which I will attempt to describe…

Caffeine free: for those who don’t do caffeine, this is an excellent option. As there is no caffeine in the tea in the first place, it does not have to be adapted in any way to remove caffeine, keeping it natural. Of course this makes it drinkable by those who can’t have caffeine, such as pregnant women. It is also perfectly safe for young children – many parents do not like their little ones having caffeine if at all possible. Some parents even put mild Rooibos into the baby’s bottle to help colic, as Rooibos has been proven to be good for various stomach ailments.

Helps you sleep: the lack of caffeine in Rooibos leads to the next benefit. Many people, myself included, will often have a cup of Rooibos before we go to bed. As it has no caffeine, it is a more sensible option than coffee – caffeine has been proven to keep us awake. Additionally, Rooibos has a soothing effect, helping us relax and improving the chances of a nice, restful sleep.

Antioxidants: one of the best known benefits of Rooibos is that it contains antioxidants. These are particularly good at fighting free radicals, which are cells that damage healthy cells. The high level of antioxidants in Rooibos can help keep away various illnesses, not least of which is heart disease. Some studies have shown that the chances of contracting certain cancers are reduced by drinking Rooibos regularly.

Circulation: evidence suggests that Rooibos can have a positive effect in fighting heart disease. It can help reduce high blood pressure, and has even been shown to help with diabetes. The same can be said for liver disease – Rooibos can be recommended for both prevention and as part of the therapy. Studies have even shown that Rooibos can be good at helping prevent respiratory problems, and in the treating of these.

High mineral content: Rooibos contains high levels of certain minerals that are important for our bodies. These include magnesium, calcium, manganese, iron and zinc.

Good for your skin: recent studies have shown that a recently brewed Rooibos teabag, when applied to the area, can reduce inflammation and help cut down on the effects of acne. Make sure you let the teabag cool first, though, before you put it on your face!

All in all, Rooibos is good for, and is enjoyable to drink. Of course, it is not a magic cure all – like most herbal teas, Rooibos is recommended for prevention, rather than cure. Watch what you eat, and do enough suitable exercise. But I can certainly recommend Rooibos as part of a healthy lifestyle.

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Green tea and Cholesterol

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Research has shown that drinking green tea can contribute to lowering your cholesterol. It lowers your bad cholesterol (LDL), but leaves your good cholesterol (HDL), alone. It is, however, important to note that green tea alone will not take care of your cholesterol problems. It must be part of a complete healthy diet, which includes exercise.

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Cocoa and your brain

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Studies have shown that hot chocolate may be good for the brain, especially as we grow older. It can increase the flow of blood to the brain, which provides increased energy, leading to improved cognitive ability. It is important that you select your brand carefully – it is the cocoa that helps, not all the artificial flavours and sugars.
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